Cardboard & Button Christmas Tree

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Cardboard and Chopstick Christmas Tree by Amber

I made this little table top Christmas tree for the girls. They are really into stringing beads and buttons these days. They love the act of decorating (and redecorating) a tiny tree.

This is also the perfect little something to send to someone who doesn’t decorate much for the holidays …… you can stuff it in an envelope.

We collected some of our orphan buttons from the ground around train stations and parks we frequent here in Tokyo and some are from our old clothes.

Cardboard Christmas Tree by Amber

To make the tree:

You will need a chopstick, scissors, cardboard and a rubber band.

  1. Trace around the mouth of a drinking glass and add 1cm to the diameter to make the largest section of the tree. Cut it out.
  2. Continue tracing and cutting out the circles, making each one about 1cm smaller than the last. I ended up with 7 layers.
  3. Poke a hole with the chopstick through each circle and thread it onto the tree, starting with the largest. Be careful not to push the circles down too far.
  4. Draw and cut out a star by lining up the corrugations so that you can thread it onto the top of the chopstick.
  5. Cut a long strip of cardboard (about 2-3cm wide) and roll it up with a rubber band to make the base.
  6. Decorate with your favorite orphan buttons or disassemble and send to a friend.

Cardboard Turn-taking Cube

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The Cardboard CollectiveWho's Turn is It? The Cardboard Collective

This cardboard die was made in an attempt to settle disputes in our house. My youngest had just turned two, and well, no dice, it didn’t work at all. The two of them actually fought over who got to play with the cube, so I just put it on my shelf, and chalked it up to a failed experiment.

At two and a half though, things have changed for the better, and the “turn cube” is doing me some justice.

Just a cardboard cube, six photos and assorted washi tape is all that you need. If you have an odd number of children in your family, you’ll need to put a “roll again” message on one face of the cube, and if you have more than 6 kids, well, I’m sure you’ve figured out a better system than this for maintaining your sanity!

For instructions on how to make the cube, you can find them here, in the book I sell in my Etsy shop. The pattern also explains how to make large cardboard blocks that you can take apart and store flat, a really cool design.

Otherwise, try a plain cube-shaped cardboard box, often the ones that ornaments come in at this time of year are perfect!

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Cardboard Costume Challenge 2014

Although it’s already Mid November, I just wanted to say thanks again to all of you who took the Cardboard Costume Challenge this year.

Whether you sent in pictures or just got thinking about the idea for the future, thanks for following us on this year’s Halloween adventure. I had so much fun working on our insect family costumes as well as the other costume tutorials.

I hope to see you again next year, and please visit the Pinterest Board now and then as you start scheming and dreaming for 2014. (I already have a request for a Humback Whale costume from the littlest one and a year might be just enough time to figure it out!)

Blue Butterfly Wings

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recycled, paper, butterfly, wings recycled, paper, butterfly, wings

recycled, paper, butterfly, wings  OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

paper, recycled, butterfly, wings

Amber
Little Blue Butterfly, 2013
Found cardboard and paper, melon and apple cartons, paper cord, watercolor, pastel chalk, white glue

part of the series:

“Insect Family”

(Inspired by this butterfly puppet by Octodrone that my daughter fell in love with.)

Cardboard Lightning Bug

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Cardboard Lightning Bug/Firefly costume by Pete via The Cardboard Collective OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Pete
Lightning Bug, 2013 (commonly mistaken for cockroach)
Found cardboard and paper, steel nuts & bolts, watercolor, white glue

part of the series:

“Insect Family”

Stay tuned for more winged cardboard creatures…..

More Cardboard Costume Challengers

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Cardboard Players Photo by Janet Chiang

Cardboard Players Photo by Janet Chiang

Where the wild things are cardboard mask by Tara Middleton

Where the Wild Things Are cardboard mask by (my incredible sister) Tara Middleton

Wall E by Jennifer Kent

Wall E costume by Jennifer Kent

A few spectacular cardboard costumes sent in, and don’t forget to check out the Flickr pool if you haven’t already!

 

Cardboard Grasshopper Costume

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Amber
Rainbow Locust, 2013
Found cardboard, melon cartons, watercolor, chalk pastel, white glue

Welcome!

…..to a tiny cardboard costume exhibition of our costumes called:

“Insect Family”

Stay tuned for more winged cardboard creatures…..